Offering multiple grid services in parallel while minimising battery degradation

Jorn Reniers's picture
TitleOffering multiple grid services in parallel while minimising battery degradation
Publication TypeConference Abstract
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsReniers, JM, Grietus Mulder, Howey, DA
VolumeBatterie Tagung
Issue2016
Place PublishedMuenster
Abstract
Most economic studies analysing the economic potential of stationary applications of batteries conclude that batteries are presently too expensive [1]–[5], although the profitability of storage might be improved by offering multiple grid services with one storage unit [6]. On top of this, most of those models for optimising battery usage in stationary applications don’t account for decreasing battery performance over their lifetime, which probably would decrease the economic viability.
 
Combination of the previous ideas can however open up a large potential: a battery is controlled in such a way that it offers those grid services resulting in maximum revenue while minimising battery ageing. For instance, deep discharging of Li-ion batteries is very detrimental for their performance. Consider then a battery which uses part of its capacity on the reserve market and the remaining of its capacity for a cycling service (e.g. load management). Not only can this improve the lifetime of a Li-ion battery compared to the case where it is only used in the cycling application (such as load management), but at the same time, this leads to extra revenue from the reserve markets (which of course has to be compared with the loss of revenue because less can be offered for the cycling application).
 
A model optimising this multiple service usage of a stationary battery is explored to test the potential of this idea. Apart from that, this model also improves current models for stationary application by including the deterioration of battery performance during usage, thereby improving accuracy and realism. If this type of model is expanded to include multiple battery types, combination of different battery technologies can potentially reduce overall costs by creating an optimised ‘virtual battery’, which takes advantages of the strengths of each battery technology.
 
 
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